Other treatment

Virtual reality for rehabilitation in Parkinson’s disease

Abstract Background Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that is best managed by a combination of medication and regular physiotherapy. In this context, virtual reality (VR) technology is proposed as a new rehabilitation tool with a possible added value over traditional physiotherapy approaches. It potentially optimises motor learning in a safe environment, and by […]

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Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) for idiopathic Parkinson’s disease

Abstract Background Idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (IPD) is a neurodegenerative disorder, with the severity of the disability usually increasing with disease duration. IPD affects patients’ health-related quality of life, disability, and impairment. Current rehabilitation approaches have limited effectiveness in improving outcomes in patients with IPD, but a possible adjunct to rehabilitation might be non-invasive brain stimulation […]

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Treadmill training for patients with Parkinson’s disease

Abstract Background Treadmill training is used in rehabilitation and is described as improving gait parameters of patients with Parkinson’s disease. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of treadmill training in improving the gait of patients with Parkinson’s disease and the acceptability and safety of this type of therapy. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Movement Disorders […]

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Physiotherapy for Parkinson’s disease: a comparison of techniques

Abstract Background Despite medical therapies and surgical interventions for Parkinson’s disease (PD), patients develop progressive disability. The role of physiotherapy is to maximise functional ability and minimise secondary complications through movement rehabilitation within a context of education and support for the whole person. The overall aim is to optimise independence, safety and wellbeing, thereby enhancing […]

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Physiotherapy versus placebo or no intervention in Parkinson’s disease

Abstract Background Despite medical therapies and surgical interventions for Parkinson’s disease (PD), patients develop progressive disability. Physiotherapy aims to maximise functional ability and minimise secondary complications through movement rehabilitation within a context of education and support for the whole person. The overall aim is to optimise independence, safety, and well-being, thereby enhancing quality of life. […]

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Comparison of speech and language therapy techniques for speech problems in Parkinson’s disease

Abstract Background Patients with Parkinson’s disease commonly suffer from speech and voice difficulties such as impaired articulation and reduced loudness. Speech and language therapy (SLT) aims to improve the intelligibility of speech with behavioural treatment techniques or instrumental aids. Objectives To compare the efficacy and effectiveness of novel SLT techniques versus a standard SLT approach […]

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Occupational therapy for patients with Parkinson’s disease

Abstract Background Despite drug and surgical therapies for Parkinson’s disease, patients develop progressive disability. It has both motor and non-motor symptomatology, and their interaction with their environment can be very complex. The role of the occupational therapist is to support the patient and help them maintain their usual level of self-care, work and leisure activities […]

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Therapies for depression in Parkinson’s disease

Abstract Background Depression is one of the most common neuropsychiatric disturbances in Parkinson’s disease. 40% of observed variation in quality of life is due to depression. However, there is little hard evidence of the efficacy and safety of antidepressant therapies in Parkinson’s disease. Objectives To assess the efficacy and safety of antidepressant therapies in idiopathic […]

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Non-pharmacological therapies for dysphagia in Parkinson’s disease

Abstract Background Dysphagia occurs frequently in Parkinson’s disease although patients themselves may be unaware of swallowing difficulties. Speech and language therapists in conjunction with nurses and dietitians use techniques that aim to improve swallowing and reduce the risk of choking, aspiration and chest infections. Objectives To compare the efficacy and effectiveness of non-pharmacological swallowing therapy […]

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