Neurooncology

Systematic screening and assessment of psychosocial well‐being and care needs of people with cancer

Abstract Background Receiving a diagnosis of cancer and the subsequent related treatments can have a significant impact on an individual’s physical and psychosocial well‐being. To ensure that cancer care addresses all aspects of well‐being, systematic screening for distress and supportive care needs is recommended. Appropriate screening could help support the integration of psychosocial approaches in […]

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Antiangiogenic therapy for high-grade glioma

Abstract Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane Review published in September 2014. The most common primary brain tumours in adults are gliomas. Gliomas span a spectrum from low to high grade and are graded pathologically on a scale of one to four according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification. High‐grade […]

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Moxibustion for alleviating side effects of chemotherapy or radiotherapy in people with cancer

Abstract Background Moxibustion, a common treatment in traditional Chinese medicine, involves burning herbal preparations containing Artemisia vulgarison or above the skin at acupuncture points. Its intended effect is to enhance body function, and it could reduce the side effects ofchemotherapy or radiotherapy and improve quality of life (QoL) inpeople with cancer. Objectives To assess the […]

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Olanzapine for the prevention and treatment of cancer-related nausea and vomiting in adults

Abstract Background Olanzapine as an antiemetic represents a new use of an antipsychotic drug. People with cancer may experience nausea andvomiting whilst receiving chemotherapy or radiotherapy, or whilst inthe palliative phase of illness. Objectives To assess the efficacy and safety of olanzapine when used as an antiemetic in the prevention and treatment of nausea and […]

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Probiotics for the prevention or treatment of chemotherapy‐ or radiotherapy‐related diarrhoea in people with cancer

Abstract Background Treament‐related diarrhoea is one of the most common and troublesome adverse effects related to chemotherapy or radiotherapy in people with cancer. Its reported incidence has been as high as 50% to 80%. Severe treatment‐related diarrhoea can lead to fluid and electrolyte losses and nutritional deficiencies and could adversely affect quality of life (QoL). […]

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Immunonutrition for patients undergoing surgery for head and neck cancer

Abstract Background Patients with head and neck cancer are often malnourished. Surgery for such cancers is complex and may be undertaken after a course of radiotherapy. As a result, patients may have postoperative complications such as fistulae and wound infections, as well as more generalised infections such as pneumonia. One possible way to enhance recovery, […]

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Surgery versus stereotactic radiotherapy for people with single or solitary brain metastasis

Abstract Background Brain metastases occur when cancer cells spread from their original site to the brain and are a frequent cause of morbidity and death in people with cancer. They occur in 20% to 40% of people during the course of their disease. Brain metastases are also the most frequent type of brain malignancy. Single […]

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Interventions for the treatment of brain radionecrosis after radiotherapy or radiosurgery

Abstract Background Brain radionecrosis (tissue death caused by radiation) can occur following high‐doseradiotherapy to brain tissue and can have a significant impact on a person’s quality of life (QoL) and function. The underlying pathophysiological mechanism remains unclear for this condition, which makes establishing effective treatments challenging. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of interventions used for […]

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Whole brain radiotherapy for the treatment of newly diagnosed multiple brain metastases

Abstract Background This is an update to the review published in the Cochrane Library (2012, Issue 4). It is estimated that 20% to 40% of people with cancer will develop brain metastases during the course of their illness. The burden of brain metastases impacts quality and length of survival. Objectives To assess the effectiveness and […]

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Magnetic resonance perfusion for differentiating low-grade from high-grade gliomas at first presentation

Abstract Background Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumour. They are graded using the WHO classification system, with Grade II-IV astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas and oligoastrocytomas. Low-grade gliomas (LGGs) are WHO Grade II infiltrative brain tumours that typically appear solid and non-enhancing on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. People with LGG often have little or no […]

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